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Still image from "The Love Bugs"

Entomology on Screen: Q&A With the Directors of ‘The Love Bugs’

The documentary film about entomologists Charlie and Lois O'Brien, who donated their 1.25 million-specimen insect collection to Arizona State University in 2017, will be screened for attendees at Entomology 2019 in November. The film's directors spoke with Entomology Today about the documentary, the messages it shares, and what they learned about entomology along the way.

potential distribution of spotted lanternfly in United States

Spotted Lanternfly: Large Potential Range in U.S. and Beyond

A new study published today in the Journal of Economic Entomology models potential suitable habitat for the invasive spotted lanternfly and shows large swaths of the United States and beyond are likely to be vulnerable should the spotted lanternfly continue to spread.

Cole Lamkin and Jocelyn Holt and Kale Rosser

How to Find the Right Mentor for Your Entomology Career

At every career stage, we need mentors to help us improve our personal and professional skillsets and provide insights on areas such as research, teaching, time management, writing, and more. Entomology Ph.D. candidate Jocelyn Holt shares tips on how to find, identify, and begin a working relationship with a career mentor.

It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s an Ecological Field Study!

In a recent study in Germany, targeted delivery of insecticides by unmanned aerial vehicles was effective against oak processionary moths. Researchers say such drones are suitable for aerial spraying during field studies and may open new doors for "precision forestry."

Culex pipiens

West Nile Virus: Reflections on 20 Years in Pursuit of an Elusive Foe

The body of knowledge built since the arrival of West Nile virus in the Americas in 1999 is now powering efforts to minimize its impact and prepare for the invasion of other mosquito-borne diseases. A new special collection in the Journal of Medical Entomology takes stock of lessons learned and progress made over the past 20 years of West Nile virus research, surveillance, and control.

Japanese beetle traps

For Less Bee Bycatch, Leave Geraniol Out of Japanese Beetle Traps

New research shows traps with eugenol and phenethyl propionate—and leaving out geraniol—remain effective in catching Japanese beetles but significantly reduce bycatch of native bees. Plus, entirely green, brown, black, or red traps are least attractive to native bees.

pecan nut casebearer - Acrobasis nuxvorella

Pecan Nut Casebearer: New Guide Provides IPM Options

Pecan is one of the few plants native to North America that is now an important horticultural crop. One of its most significant pests, however, is the pecan nut casebearer. A new guide in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management profiles the pecan nut casebearer and outlines management methods for it.

Amazing Insects ›

European paper wasp - Polistes dominula

You Can Thank Insects for Many Human Inventions

Even in this digital age, we continue to extract ideas and materials from insects and their relatives. However, the challenge of today may be to avoid a strictly utilitarian view of other organisms, whereby a species is expendable if it cannot demonstrate economic value that can be measured in dollars.

honey bee and stewart platform

How a Honey Bee’s Waggle is Inspiring Aerospace Design

Engineers may recognize the internal muscle structure of a honey bee abdomen for its resemblance to a Stewart platform, a mechanical device that enables six degrees of freedom in movement. Researchers who have found its natural equivalent in bees say the discovery is already informing their work in designing articulating nose cones for rockets.

yellowjacket - Vespula squamosa

Yellowjackets: A Look at Opportunistic Raiders of Honey Bee Hives

Yellowjackets are nuisance predators of honey bees, preying on them and pillaging their honey. But bees fight back, and healthy hives are rarely at risk. Learn more about yellowjackets, their interactions with bees, and what sets yellowjackets apart from hornets and other fellow wasps.

Toxorhynchites rutilus mosquito larva feeding

Meet the Mosquito With a Big Appetite—for Other Mosquitoes

The mosquito species Toxorhynchites rutilus is harmless to humans but is a voracious predator of other mosquitoes. Researchers in Houston, Texas, are hoping the "mosquito assassin" could be put into action as a tool for controlling mosquitoes that carry human pathogens—if they can find an efficient way to raise the predator mosquitoes in the lab.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

Research News ›

potential distribution of spotted lanternfly in United States

Spotted Lanternfly: Large Potential Range in U.S. and Beyond

A new study published today in the Journal of Economic Entomology models potential suitable habitat for the invasive spotted lanternfly and shows large swaths of the United States and beyond are likely to be vulnerable should the spotted lanternfly continue to spread.

The Entomology Profession ›

Still image from "The Love Bugs"

Entomology on Screen: Q&A With the Directors of ‘The Love Bugs’

The documentary film about entomologists Charlie and Lois O'Brien, who donated their 1.25 million-specimen insect collection to Arizona State University in 2017, will be screened for attendees at Entomology 2019 in November. The film's directors spoke with Entomology Today about the documentary, the messages it shares, and what they learned about entomology along the way.

Cole Lamkin and Jocelyn Holt and Kale Rosser

How to Find the Right Mentor for Your Entomology Career

At every career stage, we need mentors to help us improve our personal and professional skillsets and provide insights on areas such as research, teaching, time management, writing, and more. Entomology Ph.D. candidate Jocelyn Holt shares tips on how to find, identify, and begin a working relationship with a career mentor.

Michael Skvarla, Ph.D.

How a Childhood Project Inspired a Life-Long Career

Meet Michael Skvarla, Ph.D., extension entomologist and director of the Insect Identification Laboratory at Penn State University, whose career path began with a Cub Scout insect-collection project. Skvarla is the subject of the next edition of our "Standout Early Career Professionals" series.

blacklegged tick - Ixodes scapularis

Soil Ecology: Critical But Understudied in the Fight Against Ticks

In many tick species, more than three-quarters of their lives are spent off-host in the soil or among the leaf litter. A research team at Cornell University highlights an important opportunity for tick researchers and soil ecologists to collaborate to better understand what happens when the ticks aren't in contact with hosts.

Hetaerina americana damselfly

As a Watershed is Urbanized, Damselflies Show Declines

A study along a river in Central Mexico finds Hetaerina americana damselflies in reduced numbers after a decline in vegetation the addition of wastewater outlets. Researchers say the decline illustrates the impact of human land use on natural ecosystems.

Japanese barberry

Impact of Invasive Japanese Barberry Cascades Through Local Food Webs

Dense thickets of invasive Japanese barberry significantly reduce the diversity and numbers of insects and arthropods in forests, according to new research. The ripple effects can extend upward throughout local ecosystems, even affecting human health via an increased presence of Lyme disease.

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