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solar farm pollinator habitat

Pollinator Conservation on Solar Farms: The Entomology Perspective

Amid the steady growth of solar energy production in the United States, pollinator conservation at solar installations has become an appealing secondary pursuit, but the long-term success of such efforts remains to be seen. In a new article published today in the journal Environmental Entomology, a group of entomologists say pairing solar energy with pollinator habitat offers great promise, but scientific evaluation and meaningful standards will be key to making it a true win-win combination.

NEON pitfall trap

What’s That Beetle? Ask the Algorithm

Can machine learning be used for accurate species identification of beetles and other invertebrates? Researchers using carabid beetle data from the National Ecological Observatory Network created an algorithm that reached 85 percent accuracy on unidentified images. Eventually, they hope machine learning could one day be used to classify unidentified species in NEON bycatch and answer new questions about invertebrate diversity and abundance across North America.

Amazing Insects ›

Magicicada septendecim

Brood’s Clues: New Mapping Approach Puts Cicadas in Focus

More than 20 broods of periodical cicadas inhabit the eastern United States, and researchers are refining their mapping of brood ranges with increasing precision at every new emergence. A new report in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America details new advances in mapping cicadas from researchers who studied Brood VI in 2000 and 2017.

adult cicada and exuvia

Got Cicadas? Take a Picture and Help Entomologists Map Their Arrival

Scientists are looking to the public for help in mapping 17-year cicadas in the massive Brood X due to emerge from the ground this spring in the eastern U.S. The citizen-science effort, powered by a smartphone app, could generate the biggest-ever observation data set in the history of cicada research. Here's how you can participate.

Tetranychus ludeni mite

Flexible Reproduction ‘Mite’ Explain Invasion Success

Spider mites may adapt to uncertain environments by successfully inbreeding and by adjusting reproductive resources, a new study shows. The findings may help entomologists better understand and manage invasions by other haplodiploid arthropods.

eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes)

Funeral or Feast: How Termites Manage Their Dead

In a colony of eastern subterranean termites, as many as 70,000 termites may die every day. Dealing with all those corpses is critical to colony health, and a new study reveals how the primary methods for termite undertakers—burying corpses or eating them—vary by caste.  

Science Policy and Outreach ›

solar farm pollinator habitat
adult cicada and exuvia

Got Cicadas? Take a Picture and Help Entomologists Map Their Arrival

Scientists are looking to the public for help in mapping 17-year cicadas in the massive Brood X due to emerge from the ground this spring in the eastern U.S. The citizen-science effort, powered by a smartphone app, could generate the biggest-ever observation data set in the history of cicada research. Here's how you can participate.

and other associates that utilize native species. (Photo by Architect of the Capitol, via Flickr)

Planting a Tree? Choose a Native Species and Save Some Insects

Every invasive tree in the United States was intentionally introduced, and these plants often out-compete native plants while negatively affecting insects and other animals that depend on native species. You can do your part to help insects and protect local ecosystems by choosing native plants in your landscaping plans.

Research News ›

solar farm pollinator habitat

Pollinator Conservation on Solar Farms: The Entomology Perspective

Amid the steady growth of solar energy production in the United States, pollinator conservation at solar installations has become an appealing secondary pursuit, but the long-term success of such efforts remains to be seen. In a new article published today in the journal Environmental Entomology, a group of entomologists say pairing solar energy with pollinator habitat offers great promise, but scientific evaluation and meaningful standards will be key to making it a true win-win combination.

NEON pitfall trap

What’s That Beetle? Ask the Algorithm

Can machine learning be used for accurate species identification of beetles and other invertebrates? Researchers using carabid beetle data from the National Ecological Observatory Network created an algorithm that reached 85 percent accuracy on unidentified images. Eventually, they hope machine learning could one day be used to classify unidentified species in NEON bycatch and answer new questions about invertebrate diversity and abundance across North America.

Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis)

Interagency Cooperation Drives Discovery of Lyme Disease Spirochete in Exotic Tick

Analysis of Asian longhorned ticks collected in Pennsylvania found just one—out of more than 250 tested—carrying the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. The invasive tick is unlikely to play a role in Lyme transmission, but the research underscores the importance of active tick and pathogen surveillance and collaboration among agencies at local, state, and national levels.

The Entomology Profession ›

lab work
NEON pitfall trap

What’s That Beetle? Ask the Algorithm

Can machine learning be used for accurate species identification of beetles and other invertebrates? Researchers using carabid beetle data from the National Ecological Observatory Network created an algorithm that reached 85 percent accuracy on unidentified images. Eventually, they hope machine learning could one day be used to classify unidentified species in NEON bycatch and answer new questions about invertebrate diversity and abundance across North America.

Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis)

Interagency Cooperation Drives Discovery of Lyme Disease Spirochete in Exotic Tick

Analysis of Asian longhorned ticks collected in Pennsylvania found just one—out of more than 250 tested—carrying the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. The invasive tick is unlikely to play a role in Lyme transmission, but the research underscores the importance of active tick and pathogen surveillance and collaboration among agencies at local, state, and national levels.

adult cicada and exuvia

Got Cicadas? Take a Picture and Help Entomologists Map Their Arrival

Scientists are looking to the public for help in mapping 17-year cicadas in the massive Brood X due to emerge from the ground this spring in the eastern U.S. The citizen-science effort, powered by a smartphone app, could generate the biggest-ever observation data set in the history of cicada research. Here's how you can participate.

Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)

Exciting But Dreadful: New Invasive Forest Pest Arrives in South Carolina

The Asian longhorned beetle, a federally regulated invasive woodboring pest, was recently discovered in South Carolina—hundreds of miles from the nearest known infestation. Federal and state officials are working hard to try to eradicate this pest, and there are many research questions and opportunities associated with this infestation.

German cockroach (Blattella germanica)

In Search for Effective Cockroach Lures, Apple and Blueberry Come Out on Top

Monitoring for cockroach infestations in homes and buildings is hindered by a lack of effective and practical attractants, but researchers at Rutgers University say a mix of extracts from apple and blueberry has proven highly effective in lab and field settings and could lead to more successful cockroach integrated pest management programs.

Magicicada septendecim

Brood’s Clues: New Mapping Approach Puts Cicadas in Focus

More than 20 broods of periodical cicadas inhabit the eastern United States, and researchers are refining their mapping of brood ranges with increasing precision at every new emergence. A new report in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America details new advances in mapping cicadas from researchers who studied Brood VI in 2000 and 2017.

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