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Tropilaelaps clareae mite

Lab Test Rapidly IDs Potential Mite Pest of Honey Bees

Mites in the genus Tropilaelaps could follow in the footsteps of Varroa mites as significant threats to honey bees if they were to expand their range. A new test using analysis of the "melt curves" of DNA samples can discern the four known Tropilaelaps species and could be an important tool in surveillance for the mite pests in apicultural settings.

Tetranychus ludeni mite

Flexible Reproduction ‘Mite’ Explain Invasion Success

Spider mites may adapt to uncertain environments by successfully inbreeding and by adjusting reproductive resources, a new study shows. The findings may help entomologists better understand and manage invasions by other haplodiploid arthropods.

Amazing Insects ›

eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes)

Funeral or Feast: How Termites Manage Their Dead

In a colony of eastern subterranean termites, as many as 70,000 termites may die every day. Dealing with all those corpses is critical to colony health, and a new study reveals how the primary methods for termite undertakers—burying corpses or eating them—vary by caste.  

Bellura gortynoides caterpillar

The Lepidopteran Life Aquatic

Most people expect to find caterpillars in plants and trees or on the ground, but did you know some moth and butterfly larvae spend their time in aquatic habitats? Here's a look at the lesser-known, water-dwelling contingent of order Lepidoptera.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

network map

Vector-Borne Disease: CDC Report Outlines Key Steps for Prevention and Control in U.S.

Perhaps overlooked in the public eye upon its release in September, a new "framework" report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is none the less a vital step forward in the nation's efforts to better support and coordinate the prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. Here's a closer look at the report and what's next in this critical public-health pursuit.

Research News ›

Tropilaelaps clareae mite

Lab Test Rapidly IDs Potential Mite Pest of Honey Bees

Mites in the genus Tropilaelaps could follow in the footsteps of Varroa mites as significant threats to honey bees if they were to expand their range. A new test using analysis of the "melt curves" of DNA samples can discern the four known Tropilaelaps species and could be an important tool in surveillance for the mite pests in apicultural settings.

Tetranychus ludeni mite

Flexible Reproduction ‘Mite’ Explain Invasion Success

Spider mites may adapt to uncertain environments by successfully inbreeding and by adjusting reproductive resources, a new study shows. The findings may help entomologists better understand and manage invasions by other haplodiploid arthropods.

eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes)

Funeral or Feast: How Termites Manage Their Dead

In a colony of eastern subterranean termites, as many as 70,000 termites may die every day. Dealing with all those corpses is critical to colony health, and a new study reveals how the primary methods for termite undertakers—burying corpses or eating them—vary by caste.  

The Entomology Profession ›

Tetranychus ludeni mite

Flexible Reproduction ‘Mite’ Explain Invasion Success

Spider mites may adapt to uncertain environments by successfully inbreeding and by adjusting reproductive resources, a new study shows. The findings may help entomologists better understand and manage invasions by other haplodiploid arthropods.

brown marmorated stink bug

Gut Check: How Stink Bugs’ Insides Illuminate Their Eating Habits

Brown marmorated stink bugs are generalist eaters, and finding them on one plant doesn't mean they haven't also been feeding on another. New research explores the potential of DNA analysis of stink bugs' gut contents to identify the plants they've eaten in the preceding two weeks.

Aedes scapularis mosquito

Another Invasive Mosquito Species Arrives in Florida

The mosquito species Aedes scapularis had been previously detected in Florida just once, in 1945, but a new study of mosquitoes collected in 2020 has discovered that Aedes scapularis is now established on mainland Florida in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.