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Rob Morrison on youth bug hunt

An Entomologist’s Ode to Everyday Youth Outreach

A visit with family and some young cousins reminds one entomologist about why he first became interested in insects and why it's so important for scientists be ambassadors for the knowledge they have about the natural world.

pollen sorted by color

Pollen Sleuths: Tracking Pesticides in Honey Bee Pollen to Their Source Plant

When pesticides show up in the pollen that honey bees collect, can the source plant be pinpointed? A new study is the first to successfully combine chemical analysis of pollen and the keen eye of a palynologist—an expert in identifying pollen microscopically—to track pesticide in bee-collected pollen to a source plant genus.

brown marmorated stink bug - Halyomorpha halys

Stink Bugs Stay Out: Study Measures Gaps Needed for Invasion

If a structure has a gap or entrance large enough for brown marmorated stink bugs to fit through, they will find it. But a new study shows that slits less than 3 millimeters wide and holes less than 7 millimeters wide should successfully exclude the vast majority of the bugs. A related study examines how overwintering stink bugs react to corpses of their fellow bugs remaining from previous winters.

Pacific cicada killer - Sphecius convallis

When Cicada-Killer Wasps Become Cicada-Stealer Wasps

Hunting cicadas and lugging them back to a nest is hard work for a cicada-killer wasp. But sometimes all that hard work goes to waste, when a fellow wasp swoops in and lays her egg on the other wasp's prey. And that's if the cicada isn't stolen by a bird first.

Leveling the Playing Field symposium - Katelyn Kesheimer

Diversity and Inclusion in Entomology: Keeping People in the Pipeline

For the entomological profession to maximize inclusivity, leaders in the field must work to build welcoming environments for aspiring and early-career entomologists from all backgrounds. A symposium at the 2018 Joint Annual Meeting gathered perspectives on how entomologists can work to reduce bias and create safe workspaces.

Grand Challenges Vancouver summit panel

The Path Forward on Invasive Arthropods: Collaboration, Innovation, and More

Invasive insects and related arthropod species are a global challenge that transcend national borders. Stakeholders from the United States, Canada, and around the world convened in Vancouver in November 2018 to chart a path forward. Here are the key calls to action they identified to address the challenge of invasive arthropod alien species.

khapra beetle - Trogoderma granarium

Khapra Beetle Can’t Beat the Heat

The khapra beetle does outsize damage to stored grains and is a top target at ports and border crossings. Researchers in Canada have found the threshold temperature that will kill the beetle at all life stages, even diapause.

Amazing Insects ›

four species of Euwallacea

So Many Shot Hole Borers: New Research Charts Four Nearly Identical Species

Tiny beetles once known as tea shot hole borers are actually a group of four distinct species that appear almost exactly the same to even the trained eye. In a new study, researchers combine both physical measurements and molecular genetics to better define the members of the Euwallacea fornicatus cryptic species complex.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

Grand Challenges Vancouver summit panel

The Path Forward on Invasive Arthropods: Collaboration, Innovation, and More

Invasive insects and related arthropod species are a global challenge that transcend national borders. Stakeholders from the United States, Canada, and around the world convened in Vancouver in November 2018 to chart a path forward. Here are the key calls to action they identified to address the challenge of invasive arthropod alien species.

Research News ›

pollen sorted by color

Pollen Sleuths: Tracking Pesticides in Honey Bee Pollen to Their Source Plant

When pesticides show up in the pollen that honey bees collect, can the source plant be pinpointed? A new study is the first to successfully combine chemical analysis of pollen and the keen eye of a palynologist—an expert in identifying pollen microscopically—to track pesticide in bee-collected pollen to a source plant genus.

brown marmorated stink bug - Halyomorpha halys

Stink Bugs Stay Out: Study Measures Gaps Needed for Invasion

If a structure has a gap or entrance large enough for brown marmorated stink bugs to fit through, they will find it. But a new study shows that slits less than 3 millimeters wide and holes less than 7 millimeters wide should successfully exclude the vast majority of the bugs. A related study examines how overwintering stink bugs react to corpses of their fellow bugs remaining from previous winters.

The Entomology Profession ›

Rob Morrison on youth bug hunt

An Entomologist’s Ode to Everyday Youth Outreach

A visit with family and some young cousins reminds one entomologist about why he first became interested in insects and why it's so important for scientists be ambassadors for the knowledge they have about the natural world.

Leveling the Playing Field symposium - Katelyn Kesheimer

Diversity and Inclusion in Entomology: Keeping People in the Pipeline

For the entomological profession to maximize inclusivity, leaders in the field must work to build welcoming environments for aspiring and early-career entomologists from all backgrounds. A symposium at the 2018 Joint Annual Meeting gathered perspectives on how entomologists can work to reduce bias and create safe workspaces.

bees at hive

Colony Size Drives Honey Bees’ Overwinter Survival

Research in Pennsylvania shows that overall colony weight and the number of worker bees to be the leading factors in determining overwintering survival of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies. For colonies in which the combined weight of adult bees, brood, and food stores exceeded 30 kilograms, overwinter survival rates were about 94 percent.