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monarch butterfly cluster

A Look at the Science of Insect Conservation

As human-driven changes to ecosystems drive insect declines on both local and perhaps global scales, entomologists and ecologists are hard at work building the research-based foundations necessary for managed insect-conservation efforts.

Heriades bee on Erigeron speciosus

Wildflower Strips Bring Farmers Extra Money While Helping Native Bees

Planting strips of wildflowers next to crops is a boon for native bees, but few farms adopt the practice. A new study, however, shows farmers can turn an immediate profit by selling wildflower seeds retail, while the long-term benefits of increased pollination and crop yields materialize over time.

western conifer-seed bug - Leptoglossus occidentalis

Not a Kissing Bug: Invasive Western Conifer-Seed Bug Causes Undue Alarm

As the western conifer-seed bug has arrived in South America, its resemblance to kissing bugs has caused a stir, as members of the public have readily mistaken the two. Researchers in Chile recommend accessible identification keys and educational materials to better inform both health professionals and the public.

Hetaerina americana damselfly

As a Watershed is Urbanized, Damselflies Show Declines

A study along a river in Central Mexico finds Hetaerina americana damselflies in reduced numbers after a decline in vegetation the addition of wastewater outlets. Researchers say the decline illustrates the impact of human land use on natural ecosystems.

Morrison Lab hike

Entomology Students: Do You Maintain Healthy Work-Life Balance?

Our own well-being is not something that many entomology graduate students sit and think about, but it goes hand-in-hand with our scientific careers. Promoting our own well-being is an element of self-care. When we care for ourselves, we make time for activities that are necessary for complete health and wellness—emotionally, mentally, intellectually, and physically.

newspapers

How to Advocate for Entomology by Writing an Op-Ed

The op-ed traces its roots to the guest columns opposite the editorial page, but such opinion essays are still important advocacy tools in the post-newspaper era. For entomologists who want to speak up for their science, here's a quick guide to writing an op-ed and getting it published.

pink bollworm - Pectinophora gossypiella

Pink Bollworm Versus Bt Cotton: Three Countries, Three Results

A new article in the Journal of Economic Entomology examines varying levels of resistance to Bt toxins developed by the pink bollworm in the United States, China, and India over the last 20 years, illustrating the importance of incorporating refuge crops in Bt systems. 

dusky antechinus examined for ticks

Counting Ticks on Animals is More Complicated Than It Sounds

Simply counting the number of ticks on a host animal seems like a straightforward task, but an analysis of published tick research finds no single, standard method among scientists. A group of researchers says tick-counting methods should be as rigorous as any other scientific procedure and described clearly enough to allow their use in other studies.

European paper wasp - Polistes dominula

You Can Thank Insects for Many Human Inventions

Even in this digital age, we continue to extract ideas and materials from insects and their relatives. However, the challenge of today may be to avoid a strictly utilitarian view of other organisms, whereby a species is expendable if it cannot demonstrate economic value that can be measured in dollars.

UF bark and ambrosia beetle collection vial 20k

Collection of Frozen Beetles Passes 20,000 Vials

The University of Florida's Forest Entomology Lab hosts the world's largest cryo-collection of bark and ambrosia beetles. Stored at –80 degrees Celsius, the samples are critical for study of the beetles' DNA and fungal symbionts, as well as for identification of beetle outbreaks in forests.

Spathius galinae

A Promising New Parasitoid Drills Down on Emerald Ash Borers

In a recent study, the wasp Spathius galinae successfully established wild populations and outperformed other parasitoids in attacking invasive emerald ash borers in three northeastern states in the U.S. Researchers say it could become a useful biological control agent to protect native ash trees.

Amazing Insects ›

honey bee and stewart platform

How a Honey Bee’s Waggle is Inspiring Aerospace Design

Engineers may recognize the internal muscle structure of a honey bee abdomen for its resemblance to a Stewart platform, a mechanical device that enables six degrees of freedom in movement. Researchers who have found its natural equivalent in bees say the discovery is already informing their work in designing articulating nose cones for rockets.

yellowjacket - Vespula squamosa

Yellowjackets: A Look at Opportunistic Raiders of Honey Bee Hives

Yellowjackets are nuisance predators of honey bees, preying on them and pillaging their honey. But bees fight back, and healthy hives are rarely at risk. Learn more about yellowjackets, their interactions with bees, and what sets yellowjackets apart from hornets and other fellow wasps.

Toxorhynchites rutilus mosquito larva feeding

Meet the Mosquito With a Big Appetite—for Other Mosquitoes

The mosquito species Toxorhynchites rutilus is harmless to humans but is a voracious predator of other mosquitoes. Researchers in Houston, Texas, are hoping the "mosquito assassin" could be put into action as a tool for controlling mosquitoes that carry human pathogens—if they can find an efficient way to raise the predator mosquitoes in the lab.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

newspapers

How to Advocate for Entomology by Writing an Op-Ed

The op-ed traces its roots to the guest columns opposite the editorial page, but such opinion essays are still important advocacy tools in the post-newspaper era. For entomologists who want to speak up for their science, here's a quick guide to writing an op-ed and getting it published.

Research News ›

western conifer-seed bug - Leptoglossus occidentalis

Not a Kissing Bug: Invasive Western Conifer-Seed Bug Causes Undue Alarm

As the western conifer-seed bug has arrived in South America, its resemblance to kissing bugs has caused a stir, as members of the public have readily mistaken the two. Researchers in Chile recommend accessible identification keys and educational materials to better inform both health professionals and the public.

Hetaerina americana damselfly

As a Watershed is Urbanized, Damselflies Show Declines

A study along a river in Central Mexico finds Hetaerina americana damselflies in reduced numbers after a decline in vegetation the addition of wastewater outlets. Researchers say the decline illustrates the impact of human land use on natural ecosystems.

pink bollworm - Pectinophora gossypiella

Pink Bollworm Versus Bt Cotton: Three Countries, Three Results

A new article in the Journal of Economic Entomology examines varying levels of resistance to Bt toxins developed by the pink bollworm in the United States, China, and India over the last 20 years, illustrating the importance of incorporating refuge crops in Bt systems. 

The Entomology Profession ›

monarch butterfly cluster

A Look at the Science of Insect Conservation

As human-driven changes to ecosystems drive insect declines on both local and perhaps global scales, entomologists and ecologists are hard at work building the research-based foundations necessary for managed insect-conservation efforts.

Morrison Lab hike

Entomology Students: Do You Maintain Healthy Work-Life Balance?

Our own well-being is not something that many entomology graduate students sit and think about, but it goes hand-in-hand with our scientific careers. Promoting our own well-being is an element of self-care. When we care for ourselves, we make time for activities that are necessary for complete health and wellness—emotionally, mentally, intellectually, and physically.

newspapers

How to Advocate for Entomology by Writing an Op-Ed

The op-ed traces its roots to the guest columns opposite the editorial page, but such opinion essays are still important advocacy tools in the post-newspaper era. For entomologists who want to speak up for their science, here's a quick guide to writing an op-ed and getting it published.

German cockroach - Blattella germanica

Building-Wide Pest Management Program Stops Cockroaches From Moving Nextdoor

A study of the spatial distribution of German cockroaches in a high-rise apartment building found infestations were clustered in groups of adjacent units. But a building-wide integrated pest management program can be successful in eliminating most infestations and, importantly, stopping the cockroaches from migrating from one apartment to the next.

African fig fly - Zaprionus indianus

Drosophilid Melting Pot: African Fig Fly Meets Spotted-Wing Drosophila in the U.S.

The African fig fly (Zaprionus indianus) is an invasive fruit fly in North America that has been found commingling with its cousin spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), sometimes even using the latter's egg-laying sites for its own. A new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management highlights the African fig fly's biology and range and offers options for management.

Buprestid larva.

When Forest Fires Flare, Woodboring Beetles Rush In

Woodboring beetles make good food for woodpeckers, and researchers studying how forest fires affect bird populations have studied the patterns of woodboring-beetle colonization of forests after fires. Their findings offer clues and raise new questions about the impact of fires on forest ecosystems, in a time of increased fire activity and longer fire seasons.

onion thrips on onion leaf

Virus Helps Onion Thrips Live Longer, Do More Damage

Iris yellow spot virus is bad for onions, but it's good for the thrips species that carry the virus and spread it to onion plants. In a recent study, infected onion thrips lived about 20 percent longer than uninfected thrips, giving them more time to damage onion plants and transmit the virus.

Spathius galinae

A Promising New Parasitoid Drills Down on Emerald Ash Borers

In a recent study, the wasp Spathius galinae successfully established wild populations and outperformed other parasitoids in attacking invasive emerald ash borers in three northeastern states in the U.S. Researchers say it could become a useful biological control agent to protect native ash trees.

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