Another Step Forward in Genetic Engineering of Mosquitoes

mosquitoes cuticle-color genes disrupted

“Yellow, three-eyed, wingless mosquitoes” have made headlines this week, but the researchers at the University of California, Riverside, behind the news call the disruption of mosquitoes’ cuticle, wing, and eye development a “proof of concept” for a new advance in the genetic engineering method known as CRISPR/Cas9. The method may accelerate scientists’ work toward identifying the genes to target for disruption of mosquitoes’ ability to carry and transmit human diseases.

Nutritional Symbionts: Why Some Insects Don’t Have to Eat Their Vegetables

aphids

While many animals, like humans, consume a varied diet to get their necessary nutrition, some insects have learned how to cheat the system and can extract nourishment from a nutritionally poor food source through symbioses with microbial symbionts. These symbionts can be different types of bacteria, yeasts, or protozoans and are found in many different insect groups.

Short Bait Exposure Provides Control of Asian Subterranean Termite Colonies

Coptotermes gestroi termites

A new study in the Journal of Economic Entomology shows exposure to an insecticide bait known as a chitin synthesis inhibitor for as little as one day may be sufficient to eliminate a colony of Asian subterranean termites (Coptotermes gestroi).

A Place for Engineering in Entomology

bee emergence device

By Meredith Swett Walker Meghan Bennett, a Ph.D., student studying the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata), was interested in how the bees time their emergence from their nest cells. She needed to record exactly what time the bees emerge in relation to different environmental cues. But collecting this kind of data requires watching nest cells […]

Highlights From the Highlighted Posters at Entomology 2017

Catherine Dana highlighted poster

The Highlighted Posters at Entomology 2017 were selected by the Program Committee to exemplify the meeting theme of “ignite. inspire. innovate.” And they illustrate the incredible diversity of ideas, fields of study, and careers that fall under the umbrella of entomology.