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trunk refuge

Rolled Cardboard Makes a Handy Insect-Sampling Tool

A group of researchers gets creative with some simple materials: strips of cardboard, rolled up and tied with string. Affixed to tree trunks or limbs, the "trunk refugia" show promise as a simple and inexpensive tool for sampling tree-dwelling insects and arthropods.

outdoor play

Learning at Home With Bugs

Stuck at home with kids because of COVID-19? Check out this list of suggestions from bug experts about what you can do to keep kids engaged and learning.

cattle

New, Fast DNA Method Spots Pesticide-Resistant Ticks

In its effort to keep cattle fever ticks from escaping quarantine in five counties along the southern Texas border, researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture have developed an overnight DNA test that can detect ticks' genetic indicators of resistance to permethrin, a common pesticide used to manage ticks.

Brown marmorated stink bug adult and nymph

How to Tackle an Invasive Species Crisis? Build a Collaborative Team

The arrival of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) drove a far-reaching, collaborative response by researchers, integrated pest management professionals, government agencies, and growers. A new article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management looks back at this experience to share lessons learned for future invasive-species response efforts.

Hamilton Allen, Ph.D., BCE

A Coast-to-Coast Tour Lands One Entomologist on the Home Team

Meet Hamilton Allen, Ph.D., BCE, the Florida Regional Technical Director for HomeTeam Pest Defense, a national specialty brand of Rollins, Inc. Within his role, Allen provides technical and operational expertise, implements training programs, and ensures that each of the 10 branches within his region adhere to federal, state, and local pesticide application guidelines. Allen is the subject of the next installment of our "Standout Early Career Professionals" series.

Field Museum of Natural History

Fantastic Bugs and Where to Find Them (Hint: Chicago)

Entomologist Ryan Gott returns with another insect-attraction review, this time on the "Fantastic Bug Encounters!" exhibit at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, which showcases the diversity of arthropods, the mysteries of their habits, and their ingenious adaptations.

Study Details Mechanics of Flea Beetles’ Big Jumps

The tribe of leaf beetles known for their incredible jumping strength use a powerful catapult-like mechanism to spring away from looming predators. A team of Chinese and U.S. scientists illustrate the biomechanics of these beetles' jumps in a new study and say the findings could hold lessons for bio-inspired robotics.

Amazing Insects ›

Study Details Mechanics of Flea Beetles’ Big Jumps

The tribe of leaf beetles known for their incredible jumping strength use a powerful catapult-like mechanism to spring away from looming predators. A team of Chinese and U.S. scientists illustrate the biomechanics of these beetles' jumps in a new study and say the findings could hold lessons for bio-inspired robotics.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

Field Museum of Natural History

Fantastic Bugs and Where to Find Them (Hint: Chicago)

Entomologist Ryan Gott returns with another insect-attraction review, this time on the "Fantastic Bug Encounters!" exhibit at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, which showcases the diversity of arthropods, the mysteries of their habits, and their ingenious adaptations.

Research News ›

trunk refuge

Rolled Cardboard Makes a Handy Insect-Sampling Tool

A group of researchers gets creative with some simple materials: strips of cardboard, rolled up and tied with string. Affixed to tree trunks or limbs, the "trunk refugia" show promise as a simple and inexpensive tool for sampling tree-dwelling insects and arthropods.

The Entomology Profession ›

trunk refuge

Rolled Cardboard Makes a Handy Insect-Sampling Tool

A group of researchers gets creative with some simple materials: strips of cardboard, rolled up and tied with string. Affixed to tree trunks or limbs, the "trunk refugia" show promise as a simple and inexpensive tool for sampling tree-dwelling insects and arthropods.

Brown marmorated stink bug adult and nymph

How to Tackle an Invasive Species Crisis? Build a Collaborative Team

The arrival of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) drove a far-reaching, collaborative response by researchers, integrated pest management professionals, government agencies, and growers. A new article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management looks back at this experience to share lessons learned for future invasive-species response efforts.

striped cucumber beetle on watermelon

Integrated Pest Management Pays for Midwestern Watermelon Growers

Entomologists at Purdue University have developed a reliable and cost-effective scouting technique for striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) in watermelon fields. Researchers working with watermelon growers say the method could significantly reduce the unnecessary use of insecticides to manage the pest.

bed bug - Cimex lectularius

Research Confirms First Bed Bug Infestation in Costa Rica in Over 20 Years

A bed bug infestation hadn't been seen in Costa Rica since the late 1990s—until now. Researchers at the University of Costa Rica have confirmed that specimens collected from a home near San Jose in 2017 are indeed bed bugs and, surprisingly, of the temperate-zone species Cimex lectularius and not the tropical bed bug, Cimex hemipterus.

black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens)

Black Soldier Flies Show Potential as Source of Antimicrobial Compounds

Black soldier flies (Hermetia illucens) live in decomposing, bacteria-rich organic material, which demands a potent immune system. A study by researchers in Peru and France has isolated four peptides from larvae of the black soldier fly that display antibacterial properties, suggesting further "bioprospecting" research into black soldier flies could one day generate useful new antibacterial compounds for medical use.

Apple maggot Pheno Forecast map, July 1, 2019

USA National Phenology Network Aids Management of Pest Insects With Life-Stage Forecast Maps

It's easier to manage an insect pest if you can predict where and when it's likely to show up, rather than trying to react after it appears. The USA National Phenology Network's "Pheno Forecast" maps offer daily updates that model the temperature conditions necessary for a dozen forest insect pests. A new article in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America showcases the tool, part of a new special collection on geospatial analysis of invasive insects.

award plaques

Impostor Syndrome, Bias, and Doubt: Overcoming Barriers to Honoring All Entomologists

Despite an increasingly diverse profession, awards and recognition in entomology are not diversifying accordingly. What's to blame, and how can we improve? One entomologist issues a call to action for the entomological community to commit to lifting up and honoring the achievements of students and professionals from underrepresented groups in our field.

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