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adult cicada and exuvia

Got Cicadas? Take a Picture and Help Entomologists Map Their Arrival

Scientists are looking to the public for help in mapping 17-year cicadas in the massive Brood X due to emerge from the ground this spring in the eastern U.S. The citizen-science effort, powered by a smartphone app, could generate the biggest-ever observation data set in the history of cicada research. Here's how you can participate.

dung beetles perching

Where Dung Beetles Perch Says a Lot About Community Evolution

Research on dung beetle behavior shows many species, especially smaller ones, choose a "sit and wait" strategy for finding food, while only larger ones actively search for food by following animals. A pair of biologists suggest this behavior is a resource-partitioning strategy to reduce competition for scarce food.

Amazing Insects ›

Tetranychus ludeni mite

Flexible Reproduction ‘Mite’ Explain Invasion Success

Spider mites may adapt to uncertain environments by successfully inbreeding and by adjusting reproductive resources, a new study shows. The findings may help entomologists better understand and manage invasions by other haplodiploid arthropods.

eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes)

Funeral or Feast: How Termites Manage Their Dead

In a colony of eastern subterranean termites, as many as 70,000 termites may die every day. Dealing with all those corpses is critical to colony health, and a new study reveals how the primary methods for termite undertakers—burying corpses or eating them—vary by caste.  

Bellura gortynoides caterpillar

The Lepidopteran Life Aquatic

Most people expect to find caterpillars in plants and trees or on the ground, but did you know some moth and butterfly larvae spend their time in aquatic habitats? Here's a look at the lesser-known, water-dwelling contingent of order Lepidoptera.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

and other associates that utilize native species. (Photo by Architect of the Capitol, via Flickr)

Planting a Tree? Choose a Native Species and Save Some Insects

Every invasive tree in the United States was intentionally introduced, and these plants often out-compete native plants while negatively affecting insects and other animals that depend on native species. You can do your part to help insects and protect local ecosystems by choosing native plants in your landscaping plans.

network map

Vector-Borne Disease: CDC Report Outlines Key Steps for Prevention and Control in U.S.

Perhaps overlooked in the public eye upon its release in September, a new "framework" report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is none the less a vital step forward in the nation's efforts to better support and coordinate the prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. Here's a closer look at the report and what's next in this critical public-health pursuit.

Research News ›

dung beetles perching

Where Dung Beetles Perch Says a Lot About Community Evolution

Research on dung beetle behavior shows many species, especially smaller ones, choose a "sit and wait" strategy for finding food, while only larger ones actively search for food by following animals. A pair of biologists suggest this behavior is a resource-partitioning strategy to reduce competition for scarce food.

Polybia paulista wasp nest

Can Cuticle Compounds Be Extracted From Insects Preserved in Ethanol?

Researchers studying hydrocarbons in insect cuticles typically avoid specimens preserved in ethanol, for fear the solvent may interfere with chemical analysis. A new study, however, finds ethanol has little effect—at least in the case of one wasp species tested—and opens the possibility that ethanol-preserved insects can indeed be used for the analysis of cuticular chemical compounds.

The Entomology Profession ›

Polybia paulista wasp nest

Can Cuticle Compounds Be Extracted From Insects Preserved in Ethanol?

Researchers studying hydrocarbons in insect cuticles typically avoid specimens preserved in ethanol, for fear the solvent may interfere with chemical analysis. A new study, however, finds ethanol has little effect—at least in the case of one wasp species tested—and opens the possibility that ethanol-preserved insects can indeed be used for the analysis of cuticular chemical compounds.

and other associates that utilize native species. (Photo by Architect of the Capitol, via Flickr)

Planting a Tree? Choose a Native Species and Save Some Insects

Every invasive tree in the United States was intentionally introduced, and these plants often out-compete native plants while negatively affecting insects and other animals that depend on native species. You can do your part to help insects and protect local ecosystems by choosing native plants in your landscaping plans.

blacklegged ticks

Let’s Collaborate: How Entomology Students Can Drive Multidisciplinary Work

Weighty problems like the threat of vector-borne disease require more than just entomological solutions, and students of insect science can be leaders in bringing together research from a variety of fields. One student shares his view on the potential collaborations that students could develop to mitigate the rise of tick-borne disease.

Tetranychus ludeni mite

Flexible Reproduction ‘Mite’ Explain Invasion Success

Spider mites may adapt to uncertain environments by successfully inbreeding and by adjusting reproductive resources, a new study shows. The findings may help entomologists better understand and manage invasions by other haplodiploid arthropods.

Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)

Exciting But Dreadful: New Invasive Forest Pest Arrives in South Carolina

The Asian longhorned beetle, a federally regulated invasive woodboring pest, was recently discovered in South Carolina—hundreds of miles from the nearest known infestation. Federal and state officials are working hard to try to eradicate this pest, and there are many research questions and opportunities associated with this infestation.

and other associates that utilize native species. (Photo by Architect of the Capitol, via Flickr)

Planting a Tree? Choose a Native Species and Save Some Insects

Every invasive tree in the United States was intentionally introduced, and these plants often out-compete native plants while negatively affecting insects and other animals that depend on native species. You can do your part to help insects and protect local ecosystems by choosing native plants in your landscaping plans.

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