Skip to content
four invasive insects

Invasive Insects: The Top 4 “Most Wanted” List

The list of invasive insects in the United States is a long one, but one entomologist offers his list of the top four "most wanted"—plus a note about how entomologists are working to better manage the challenge of invasive insect species.

bee with egg powder

New and Easy Marking Method Tracks Bees Without Killing Them

A new study published in the Journal of Insect Science outlines a new technique that quickly, simply, and inexpensively marks bees to track their movement—and it's non-lethal, too. It could make for an valuable improvement for mark-and-recapture methods for these pollinators.

grassland patch burn

Do Managed Burns in Grasslands Benefit Butterflies?

Though under-used, prescribed fire can reinstate natural disturbance regimes in the North American Great Plains. The Range Science program at North Dakota State University is studying how this practice affects the local ecosystem, including its impact on pollinators such as butterflies.

NYC roadway median

A Day in the Life: Entomology in the Big Apple

For many entomologists, field experiments happen in actual "fields"—croplands or prairies, for instance—but urban ecologist Elsa Youngsteadt, Ph.D., often finds herself in much different spaces, such as the Broadway median in New York City's Upper West Side.

Mimeresia neavei

What Gives This Butterfly Species the Only Blue Wings in its Subtribe?

Males of the butterfly species Mimeresia neavei feature blue, structurally colored wings, the only species in the Mimacraeina subtribe to do so. Researchers in Hungary credit M. neavei's blue wings to a form of coloration found in several butterfly groups but not experimentally examined within Lycaenidae.

Hessian fly - Mayetiola destructor

Hessian Fly: New Guide Details Wheat Pest Management

The Hessian fly is a major pest of wheat around the world. A new guide in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management outlines the fly's biology and life cycle and an array of tactics that can be combined to manage the pest.

Kate Mathis collecting twig-nesting ants

From Garden Peonies to a Career Studying Ant-Plant Interactions

Kate Mathis, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at the University of Arizona and soon-to-be assistant professor at Clark University, got hooked on entomology at a young age, when she saw ants swarm peonies in her mother's garden every spring as they bloomed. Today, she carries that fascination into her research on complex species interactions.

Amazing Insects ›

Bactrocera dorsalis

Gut Microbes Can Help Insects Beat Pesticides

Insects have evolved a variety of mechanisms to try to overcome the effects of insecticides—including, in some cases, help from the bacteria and other microbes living in insects' guts. A growing number of studies indicate a link between symbiotic microbes and insecticide resistance in a diverse range of insects.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

insect and arthropod specimens in resin

Team Develops New Protocol for Embedding Insects in Resin

Insect and arthropod specimens set in clear resin are a valuable tool for teaching entomology both in the classroom and in public outreach. A team at Texas A&M University has developed an efficient, cost-effective process for resin casting and shares the instructions with the entomological community.

2018 March for Science

Entomologists Urge Action, Advocacy After 2018 March for Science

Entomologists Ashley Kennedy and Lina Bernaola participated in the 2018 March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 14.  Kennedy and Bernaola say that, though the March was smaller than the 2017 edition, it left them inspired to "continue taking steps forward to enhance advocacy for science."

eastern larch beetle

Eastern Larch Beetle Outbreak Just Keeps Going When Winter’s Not So Cold

The current outbreak of eastern larch beetle in northern Minnesota is going into its 18th year, and researchers have found that at least some eastern larch beetles are able to reach maturity without requiring an overwintering period. In short, warmer winters mean eastern larch beetle is killing trees faster than it can be managed.

Research News ›

bee with egg powder

New and Easy Marking Method Tracks Bees Without Killing Them

A new study published in the Journal of Insect Science outlines a new technique that quickly, simply, and inexpensively marks bees to track their movement—and it's non-lethal, too. It could make for an valuable improvement for mark-and-recapture methods for these pollinators.

The Entomology Profession ›

NYC roadway median

A Day in the Life: Entomology in the Big Apple

For many entomologists, field experiments happen in actual "fields"—croplands or prairies, for instance—but urban ecologist Elsa Youngsteadt, Ph.D., often finds herself in much different spaces, such as the Broadway median in New York City's Upper West Side.

Female anopheles gambiae mosquito feeding detailed high definiti

Cannibalism in Mosquito Larvae Confounds Egg Counts

New research shows that late-stage Anopheles gambiae larvae will eat eggs and first-instar larvae of their own species, calling into question the common view that females of the mosquito species avoid laying eggs in water where other larvae are already present.

chigger mite

Mites Emerge as Key Vector in Encephalitis Outbreaks in India

Larval mites, known as "chiggers," from the family Trombiculidae are vectors of the bacteria that causes scrub typhus. The infection has been implicated as a common cause of acute encephalitis syndrome in India, where public health professionals are looking to better understand the variety of mite species present on rodents and their rates of infection.