What Got the Most Buzz in 2016 on Entomology Today?

Aedes aegypti

With the end of the year upon us, Entomology Today will enter a brief diapause over the holidays, and we’ll be back in action on January 3, 2017. So, for our final post of 2016, let’s take a quick look back at some of the most popular entomology news and perspectives shared here this year. […]

Wild Plants Might Not Work as Refuges for Stem Borers in African Bt Crops

Eldana saccharina stem borer

By Josh Lancette When using Bt crops, a constant concern is preventing insect pests from becoming resistant. According to a paper published in the Journal of Economic Entomology that contains new analysis of previous studies, a common tactic to prevent resistance in Africa might not be working as hoped. Bt crops are plants that have […]

Beetle Fossil Nearly Doubles the Age of Known Parasites of Social Insects

Mesosymbion compactus

When ancient insects first evolved eusocial behavior and began forming colonies, it didn’t take long, paleontologically speaking, for parasites of those resource-rich colonies to evolve, as well. A newly discovered ancient species of beetle found preserved in amber dates this apparent parasitic behavior to at least 98.8 million years ago. In a paper published in […]

From Wisconsin to Laos: The Entomological Journey of Dr. Paul Brey

Institut Pasteur du Laos bulletin board

By Laura Kraft This post is the second in the “Travel Bug” series by Laura Kraft, a recent graduate from the University of Georgia, who will be chronicling her travels in Asia from an entomological perspective. See earlier posts from the series. Sitting in the lobby of the Insitut Pasteur du Laos in Vientiane, you […]

Teaching An Old Parasitoid Wasp New Tricks

Trichogramma wasps from one Manduca egg

By Josh Lancette You may not be able to teach an old dog new tricks, but it turns out you can teach an old parasitoid wasp new tricks—and only the old ones. A new study in the Journal of Insect Science reports that Trichogramma wasps are able to learn as adults the olfactory cues to […]

Teaching Curriculum for Bed Bug Prevention Proves Its Worth

bed bug

When the big yellow bus arrives at school in the morning, it could be unloading more than just kids. In communities where bed bugs (Cimex lectularius Linnaeus) are present, children’s book bags are one of their favorite places to hitch a ride to a new home. Preventing this kind of spread is a core element […]

How Fast Does Emerald Ash Borer Kill Trees in Our Forests?

Ash forest affected by emerald ash borer

By Laurel Haavik Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, a shiny green beetle from Asia commonly known as the emerald ash borer (EAB), has taken North America by storm. Assisted mostly by people, but also by its own wings, EAB is rapidly spreading across urban and forested areas alike. EAB-killed ash trees in urban areas are noticeable and […]

Kiss and Tell: How Ants Communicate Mouth-to-Mouth

Ants may do more than exchange food via trophallaxis.

Children are often admonished to not talk with food in their mouths. Ants, on the other hand, may be doing it regularly. Mouth-to-mouth food sharing, known as trophallaxis, is common among social insects like ants. A new study from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, suggests ants also “talk” and influence colony development via trophallaxis by […]

Judas Beetles: How Coconut Rhinoceros Beetles Are Betraying Each Other’s Secrets

tagged coconut rhinoceros beetle

  By Josh Lancette It starts with the search for a mate. It ends with betrayal. And death. And a toppled crime empire. How? Someone is wearing a wire from the feds. Specifically, that someone is a coconut rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros. Its empire? An army of its kind aiming to destroy palm trees in […]