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A Gathering of Minds on Managing Invasive Insects and Arthropods

invasive arthropods summit - group picture

Part of the Grand Challenge Agenda for Entomology, the summit “Addressing the North American and Pacific Rim Invasive Insect and Arthropod Species Challenge,” drew more than 150 experts in invasive species from academia, industry, government, and entomological societies, hailing from Canada, the United States, and beyond.

A decade or two ago, it’s possible that a two-day summit on invasive arthropods wouldn’t have drawn a significant crowd. But, in 2018, the call to address the challenge of invasive insect and arthropod species around the world is loud and clear, and the gathering of minds in Vancouver November 9-10 showed the energy and commitment of the global entomological community to tackling it.

Part of the Grand Challenge Agenda for Entomology, the summit “Addressing the North American and Pacific Rim Invasive Insect and Arthropod Species Challenge,” drew more than 150 experts in invasive species from academia, industry, government, and entomological societies, hailing from Canada, the United States, and beyond. The two days featured a variety of panel presentations, group discussions, and thought-leader perspectives, as well as an on-the-spot, collaborative effort to craft action statements on key issues in invasive species management.

A draft Invasive Arthropod Species International Management Plan is in the works—in fact, summit participants worked to mark up and refine the statement on site—and a symposium on Wednesday, November 14, at the Joint Annual Meeting of the Entomological Societies of America, Canada, and British Columbia will offer a report on the progress made at the summit and discuss next steps.

Below, check out more scenes from the summit:

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