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wound treated via maggot therapy

wound treated via maggot therapy

“In published studies of patients with non-healing wounds scheduled for amputation but given maggot therapy as a last resort, maggot therapy was shown to save those limbs in 50 percent to 70 percent of patients,” says Ronald A. Sherman, M.D. Though over 100,000 amputations are performed every year just in Americans with diabetes-related wounds, less than 2 percent are offered a trial of maggot therapy to save those limbs. “Correcting that missed opportunity to save a limb has been a great challenge, but it is also an opportunity to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people,” Sherman says. Shown here is an example of a patient’s wound prior to treatment (left), immediately after treatment with maggot therapy (middle), and after healing (right). (Photos courtesy of Ronald A. Sherman, M.D.)

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