More Overwintering Monarch Butterflies Died in March 2016 Snowstorm Than First Estimated

Monarch butterflies killed in winter storm

A much greater number of monarch butterflies perished in a snowstorm in March 2016 in Mexico than previously estimated, according to new research. Analysis of damage from the storm—and the ensuing salvage logging—sheds further light on the precarious state of the famed butterflies’ overwintering colonies. Approximately 30-38 percent of the monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in […]

Entomology Takes the Stage (and the Airwaves) at Science Friday Live

science friday live - field visit

Last Saturday, on the stage of the Orpheum Theatre in Wichita, Kansas, entomologist Rachel Stone told the audience gathered there that a pile of animal poop is a lot like a pile of cheeseburgers—to a dung beetle, that is. Stone, a graduate researcher working in forensic ecology at Wichita State University, was a guest for […]

How Salt, a Coffee Filter, and a Microscope Could Aid in Managing Spotted-Wing Drosophila

filter method for finding spotted-wing drosophila

By Andrew Porterfield The red-eyed, spotted fly first appeared in the United States in strawberry, raspberry, and blackberry crops in Santa Cruz County, California, in 2008. Then the Southeast Asian invader Drosophila suzukii began showing up in crops in other areas of coastal California, eventually making its way to the far Pacific Northwest and then […]

Why Science Communication is Critical to the Future of Entomology

Tabatha Yang talking bugs

By Margaret Hardy, MSc, Ph.D., FRES Recent efforts to bring science communication into the scholarship of the teaching and learning umbrella has met with some success. The emergence of commercially available platforms to measure the reach and impact of scholarly work has made altmetrics another reportable score, in addition to other quantifiable measures like citation […]

Alternatives: Entomologists Who Use Their Hard-Earned Research Skills in Non-Research Careers

Rayda Krell coffee table safari

By Laurel Haavik, Ph.D. Editor’s Note: This is the next installment in the “Behind the Science” series by Laurel Haavik that peeks into the lives of scientists. See other posts in the series. Graduate school, the traditional conduit to an academic career, trains people to conduct research. Yet, many people with graduate degrees don’t end […]