Cirque du Soleil OVO

Insects Take Center Stage at Cirque du Soleil OVO

Entomologist Ryan Gott reviews the Cirque du Soleil show "OVO," calling it a must-see for entomologists and insect enthusiasts. By his count, no fewer than nine insect orders were represented by performers in the show.

Augochlorella aurata bee

Study Shows How Prescribed Burns Benefit Bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

award plaques

Impostor Syndrome, Bias, and Doubt: Overcoming Barriers to Honoring All Entomologists

Despite an increasingly diverse profession, awards and recognition in entomology are not diversifying accordingly. What's to blame, and how can we improve? One entomologist issues a call to action for the entomological community to commit to lifting up and honoring the achievements of students and professionals from underrepresented groups in our field.

Apple maggot Pheno Forecast map, July 1, 2019

USA National Phenology Network Aids Management of Pest Insects With Life-Stage Forecast Maps

It's easier to manage an insect pest if you can predict where and when it's likely to show up, rather than trying to react after it appears. The USA National Phenology Network's "Pheno Forecast" maps offer daily updates that model the temperature conditions necessary for a dozen forest insect pests. A new article in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America showcases the tool, part of a new special collection on geospatial analysis of invasive insects.

Varroa destructor mite

Varroa Mites: New Guide Outlines Integrated Pest Management Options

A growing consensus deems Varroa mite infestation to be the leading factor in the struggles of honey bees in managed hives around the world. A new profile in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management details the biology and life cycle of the Varroa destructor mite and the IPM approach to control the devastating ectoparasites.

black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens)

Black Soldier Flies Show Potential as Source of Antimicrobial Compounds

Black soldier flies (Hermetia illucens) live in decomposing, bacteria-rich organic material, which demands a potent immune system. A study by researchers in Peru and France has isolated four peptides from larvae of the black soldier fly that display antibacterial properties, suggesting further "bioprospecting" research into black soldier flies could one day generate useful new antibacterial compounds for medical use.

Jackson Helms IV, Ph.D.

Marine to Myrmecologist: One Entomologist’s Journey to Understand and Conserve Native Biodiversity

Meet Jackson Helms IV, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at the Kellogg Biological Station at Michigan State University, whose research focuses on how restoring intensive agriculture to native vegetation maximizes the ecosystem services of insects; how dispersal tradeoffs shape population dynamics, species interactions, and the evolution of life histories; and how to conserve and protect landscapes. Jackson is the subject of the next installment of our "Standout Early Career Professionals" series.

citrus greening - trees

A People Problem and Plant Disease: The Economics of Pest Management in Citrus Greening

Citrus greening disease is seriously hindering citrus production in the United States, but generating widespread adoption of the best integrated pest management practices among growers is a challenge, especially when livelihoods are on the line. Recognizing the strong economic factors at play in management decisions will help improve plans for increasing IPM adoption.

bumble bees on Penstamon rydbergii

New Study Helps California’s Bumble Bees by Identifying Their Favorite Flowers

Research in the Sierra Nevada region of California illustrates the varying flower choices of bumble bees: The five most common bumble bee species studied each selected a different assortment of flowers, and each selected at least one flower species not selected by the others. The findings are already being put to use in forest restoration efforts to increase and improve quality of bumble bee habitat.