A New Taxon for Worm-Like Mites: Eriophyoidea and Nematalycidae

Aceria anthocoptes

By Samuel Bolton Eriophyoidea, the superfamily of arthropods commonly known as gall mites (though not all of them form galls) or four-legged mites (though not all mites with four legs are in Eriophyoidea), are worm-like mites that are important and sometimes devastating parasites of plants. These mites represent one of the largest and earliest adaptive […]

Predicting Shifts in the Range of Invasive Insect Species in the Face of Climate Change

pea leafminer

By John P. Roche As average temperatures rise globally, the ranges of many species will be affected. Climate-induced shifts in the ranges of invasive species will be particularly important because of the high economic and ecological impacts of these species. And predicting the extent to which temperature increases could affect the range of invasive species […]

Can a Forensic Entomologist Really Calculate Time of Death?

forensic entomology workshop

By Denise Gemmellaro This is the second part in a series of posts on forensic entomology. Read Part One and stay tuned for future posts in the coming weeks here on Entomology Today. Medicolegal forensic entomology is a field of entomology focused on the study and observation insects that, because of their feeding behavior and biology, […]

Could a Null-Hypothesis Model Bring Greater Clarity to Forensic Entomology?

green bottle fly

In its popular understanding, forensic entomology is the field of science that uses certain insects’ affinity for decomposition as a tool in death investigations. It is, of course, not as simple as TV crime dramas might lead you to believe, and practicing forensic entomologists know first-hand just how complicated the science is. Part of that […]

Search Continues for Methods to Control Fungus-Farming Beetle in SoCal Trees

polyphagous shot hole borer side view

By Meredith Swett Walker A spate of tree deaths in California has arborists, park managers, and home owners alarmed. Keen-eyed tree caretakers might notice a cluster of tiny holes in the bark of affected trees—almost as if the tree had been shot with a Lilliputian shotgun. But the culprit is not a tiny tree hitman […]