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Category: Research News

Recent entomological research from ESA journals and ESA members

dusky antechinus examined for ticks

Counting Ticks on Animals is More Complicated Than It Sounds

Simply counting the number of ticks on a host animal seems like a straightforward task, but an analysis of published tick research finds no single, standard method among scientists. A group of researchers says tick-counting methods should be as rigorous as any other scientific procedure and described clearly enough to allow their use in other studies.

Spathius galinae

A Promising New Parasitoid Drills Down on Emerald Ash Borers

In a recent study, the wasp Spathius galinae successfully established wild populations and outperformed other parasitoids in attacking invasive emerald ash borers in three northeastern states in the U.S. Researchers say it could become a useful biological control agent to protect native ash trees.

Buprestid larva.

When Forest Fires Flare, Woodboring Beetles Rush In

Woodboring beetles make good food for woodpeckers, and researchers studying how forest fires affect bird populations have studied the patterns of woodboring-beetle colonization of forests after fires. Their findings offer clues and raise new questions about the impact of fires on forest ecosystems, in a time of increased fire activity and longer fire seasons.

European earwigs

European Earwig: Fruit Pest, Potential Ally, or Both?

A new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management busts some myths about the European earwig (Forficula auricularia). Though perceived as a pest, it is actually an underappreciated biological control agent and likely a beneficial insect in most apple orchards.

African fig fly - Zaprionus indianus

Drosophilid Melting Pot: African Fig Fly Meets Spotted-Wing Drosophila in the U.S.

The African fig fly (Zaprionus indianus) is an invasive fruit fly in North America that has been found commingling with its cousin spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), sometimes even using the latter's egg-laying sites for its own. A new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management highlights the African fig fly's biology and range and offers options for management.

onion thrips on onion leaf

Virus Helps Onion Thrips Live Longer, Do More Damage

Iris yellow spot virus is bad for onions, but it's good for the thrips species that carry the virus and spread it to onion plants. In a recent study, infected onion thrips lived about 20 percent longer than uninfected thrips, giving them more time to damage onion plants and transmit the virus.

honey bee and stewart platform

How a Honey Bee’s Waggle is Inspiring Aerospace Design

Engineers may recognize the internal muscle structure of a honey bee abdomen for its resemblance to a Stewart platform, a mechanical device that enables six degrees of freedom in movement. Researchers who have found its natural equivalent in bees say the discovery is already informing their work in designing articulating nose cones for rockets.

German cockroach - Blattella germanica

Building-Wide Pest Management Program Stops Cockroaches From Moving Nextdoor

A study of the spatial distribution of German cockroaches in a high-rise apartment building found infestations were clustered in groups of adjacent units. But a building-wide integrated pest management program can be successful in eliminating most infestations and, importantly, stopping the cockroaches from migrating from one apartment to the next.

longan tree

New Guide Details Pest-Management Practices for Longan

A major fruit export from Vietnam, longan has been well studied in Southeast Asia, but a new profile in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management offers a compilation of longan IPM research for potentially new audiences.

mandarin oranges

Mandarin Boom Means Citrus Pest Management Must Evolve

The rise in popularity of mandarin oranges has outpaced knowledge of how integrated pest management (IPM) for them might differ from that of larger oranges. New research combines field study with years of data from citrus groves and shows that mandarins stand up surprisingly well to insect pests.