Skip to content

Category: Research News

Recent entomological research from ESA journals and ESA members

growers in field

Why Integrated Pest Management is Due for a Reset

In a new paper in American Entomologist, three experts suggest a modified focus for integrated pest management that better accounts for evolution and tolerance to pest injury and shifts from control toward management.

Diadasia rinconis mating scramble

Busy Bees: An Up-Close Look at One Bee Species’ Scramble to Mate

With high-speed, high-definition cameras, researchers at the University of Arizona got an unprecedented look at the mating habits of the solitary bee species Diadasia rinconis and gained new insights into their courtship behaviors and the selective pressures those behaviors produce.

bee hive smoking

Why Smoking Soothes the Stressed-Out Bee Hive

A new study that explores the effect of smoke on honey bee (Apis mellifera) behavior finds that it reduces the instance of bees releasing a venom droplet in their signaling of danger to other bees, which researchers speculate may thereby reduce the amount of alarm pheromone released.

Japanese Encephalitis - Epidemiologic Triad

The Case for Greater Focus on Mosquitoes and Other Arthropod Vectors in Epidemiology

The textbook approach to managing disease outbreaks focuses on pathogen, host, and environment but leaves out insect or arthropod vectors. For afflictions such as Zika, malaria, and Lyme, a report in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America proposes a new version of the classic 'epidemiologic triad' that better reflects the complexities of managing vector-borne diseases.

honey dyed red

Funny Honey at the Zoo Reveals Bees’ Foraging on Sugar Baits

In the course of a study on mosquito movement, researchers discovered that local colonies of honey bees had foraged on a nontoxic sugar bait meant for the mosquitoes. The bait was dyed red to track mosquitoes that fed on it, but the dye also showed up in much of the bees' honey.