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Category: Science Policy and Outreach

Grand Challenge and Policy Updates; Outreach and Science Communication

ESA delegates to March for Science SIGNS Summit

What Five Entomologists Learned at the March for Science Summit

Five entomologists, participating on behalf of the Entomological Society of America, attended the March for Science summit "Science | Government, Institutions & Society" in Chicago, July 6-8. Here's a glimpse at how the event motivated them to "stand up for science."

four invasive insects

Invasive Insects: The Top 4 “Most Wanted” List

The list of invasive insects in the United States is a long one, but one entomologist offers his list of the top four "most wanted"—plus a note about how entomologists are working to better manage the challenge of invasive insect species.

insect and arthropod specimens in resin

Team Develops New Protocol for Embedding Insects in Resin

Insect and arthropod specimens set in clear resin are a valuable tool for teaching entomology both in the classroom and in public outreach. A team at Texas A&M University has developed an efficient, cost-effective process for resin casting and shares the instructions with the entomological community.

2018 March for Science

Entomologists Urge Action, Advocacy After 2018 March for Science

Entomologists Ashley Kennedy and Lina Bernaola participated in the 2018 March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 14.  Kennedy and Bernaola say that, though the March was smaller than the 2017 edition, it left them inspired to "continue taking steps forward to enhance advocacy for science."

eastern larch beetle

Eastern Larch Beetle Outbreak Just Keeps Going When Winter’s Not So Cold

The current outbreak of eastern larch beetle in northern Minnesota is going into its 18th year, and researchers have found that at least some eastern larch beetles are able to reach maturity without requiring an overwintering period. In short, warmer winters mean eastern larch beetle is killing trees faster than it can be managed.

spotted lanternfly - Lycorma delicatula

Spotted Lanternfly: States Urge Citizens to Report Sightings of Invasive Insect Hitchhiker

First encountered in the United States in Pennsylvania in 2014, the spotted lanternfly had spread to New York, Delaware, and Virginia by early 2018. The invasive insect threatens Tree of Heaven as well as grapes, hops, and fruit trees, and it has a penchant for hitchhiking. Anyone sighting spotted lanternfly is urged to report it to their state agriculture department or local extension office.