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three tick species

New CDC Tick Study Adds to Promise of Permethrin-Treated Clothing

Experiments conducted at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed clothing treated with permethrin had strong toxic effects on three primary germ-carrying tick species, interfering with the ticks' ability to move properly and likely interfering with their ability to bite.

Honey bee gait on vertical wall walking straight

Want a Wall-Walking Robot? Look to the Honey Bees

Research into the pattern of walking in honey bees as they scale a vertical surface shows they switch their style of gait when turning compared to when walking in a straight line. The insights into bees' biomechanics may have future applications in robotics.

Female anopheles gambiae mosquito feeding detailed high definiti

Cannibalism in Mosquito Larvae Confounds Egg Counts

New research shows that late-stage Anopheles gambiae larvae will eat eggs and first-instar larvae of their own species, calling into question the common view that females of the mosquito species avoid laying eggs in water where other larvae are already present.

entomology poster

Anatomy of a Great Entomological Research Poster

What makes a great research poster? Authors of past winning posters at Entomological Society of America meetings recommend good storytelling, succinct wording, appealing visuals, and a simple presentation overall—great advice for entomology students and professionals alike as they prepare their posters for Entomology 2018.

insect and arthropod specimens in resin

Team Develops New Protocol for Embedding Insects in Resin

Insect and arthropod specimens set in clear resin are a valuable tool for teaching entomology both in the classroom and in public outreach. A team at Texas A&M University has developed an efficient, cost-effective process for resin casting and shares the instructions with the entomological community.

EntSoc17 Awards Display

Award Opportunities Abound for Students in Entomology

For an entomology student, earning an award from the Entomological Society of America can be a source of encouragement, an opportunity to gain name recognition, and a chance to meet new colleagues and role models at ESA meetings. One past student award winner shares her experience and advice.

2018 March for Science

Entomologists Urge Action, Advocacy After 2018 March for Science

Entomologists Ashley Kennedy and Lina Bernaola participated in the 2018 March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 14.  Kennedy and Bernaola say that, though the March was smaller than the 2017 edition, it left them inspired to "continue taking steps forward to enhance advocacy for science."

insect sampling - bodycam evaluation 1

Bodycams Can Make for Better Agricultural Pest Management, Too

In a new study at the University of Arizona, researchers used body-mounted cameras to evaluate the efficiency of two insect pest sampling techniques—a sweepnet and a vacuum—in a cotton field. The perspective offered new insights into how such methods can be evaluated and could help growers and integrated pest management professionals further fine-tune their sampling techniques.

three tick species

In Tick Management, Species Matters

One key factor plays a role in how well any particular tick-management method might work: Which tick species is it best suited for? A new guide in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management reviews research on tick management tools and their effectiveness on three tick species: the blacklegged tick, the lone star tick, and the American dog tick.

spotted-wing drosophila feeding on strawberry puree

Fruit DNA in Invasive Flies’ Guts Could Help Track Their Dispersal

A recent study at North Carolina State University shows that DNA analysis of spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) flies can detect whether they fed on strawberries as much as seven days prior. Researchers hope the proof of concept will lead to more accurate analysis of the invasive pest's dispersal in the field.

Amazing Insects ›

Paederus fuscipes rove beetle and Skeeter drone model

The Sting of Defeat: A Brief History of Insects in Warfare

In the course of history, entomology has at times intersected with humanity's militaristic motives. From deploying harmful insects against enemies to modeling technological advances on insect biomechanics, explore some of the ways insects have been used in human warfare.

Science Policy and Outreach ›

four invasive insects

Invasive Insects: The Top 4 “Most Wanted” List

The list of invasive insects in the United States is a long one, but one entomologist offers his list of the top four "most wanted"—plus a note about how entomologists are working to better manage the challenge of invasive insect species.

insect and arthropod specimens in resin

Team Develops New Protocol for Embedding Insects in Resin

Insect and arthropod specimens set in clear resin are a valuable tool for teaching entomology both in the classroom and in public outreach. A team at Texas A&M University has developed an efficient, cost-effective process for resin casting and shares the instructions with the entomological community.

2018 March for Science

Entomologists Urge Action, Advocacy After 2018 March for Science

Entomologists Ashley Kennedy and Lina Bernaola participated in the 2018 March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 14.  Kennedy and Bernaola say that, though the March was smaller than the 2017 edition, it left them inspired to "continue taking steps forward to enhance advocacy for science."

Research News ›

Japanese Encephalitis - Epidemiologic Triad

The Case for Greater Focus on Mosquitoes and Other Arthropod Vectors in Epidemiology

The textbook approach to managing disease outbreaks focuses on pathogen, host, and environment but leaves out insect or arthropod vectors. For afflictions such as Zika, malaria, and Lyme, a report in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America proposes a new version of the classic 'epidemiologic triad' that better reflects the complexities of managing vector-borne diseases.

honey dyed red

Funny Honey at the Zoo Reveals Bees’ Foraging on Sugar Baits

In the course of a study on mosquito movement, researchers discovered that local colonies of honey bees had foraged on a nontoxic sugar bait meant for the mosquitoes. The bait was dyed red to track mosquitoes that fed on it, but the dye also showed up in much of the bees' honey.

The Entomology Profession ›

ESA delegates to March for Science SIGNS Summit

What Five Entomologists Learned at the March for Science Summit

Five entomologists, participating on behalf of the Entomological Society of America, attended the March for Science summit "Science | Government, Institutions & Society" in Chicago, July 6-8. Here's a glimpse at how the event motivated them to "stand up for science."

Menestheus mcphersoni

A New Stink Bug Species Named After a Stink Bug Person

A newly described species of stink bug is named in honor of distinguished entomologist and stink-bug expert Jay McPherson, Ph.D., whose advice to an early-career entomologist led to the specimen being deemed its own species rather than a subspecies.

three tick species

New CDC Tick Study Adds to Promise of Permethrin-Treated Clothing

Experiments conducted at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed clothing treated with permethrin had strong toxic effects on three primary germ-carrying tick species, interfering with the ticks' ability to move properly and likely interfering with their ability to bite.

four invasive insects

Invasive Insects: The Top 4 “Most Wanted” List

The list of invasive insects in the United States is a long one, but one entomologist offers his list of the top four "most wanted"—plus a note about how entomologists are working to better manage the challenge of invasive insect species.

Paederus fuscipes rove beetle and Skeeter drone model

The Sting of Defeat: A Brief History of Insects in Warfare

In the course of history, entomology has at times intersected with humanity's militaristic motives. From deploying harmful insects against enemies to modeling technological advances on insect biomechanics, explore some of the ways insects have been used in human warfare.

Onychophoran and Lepidopteran Mimic - side-by-side

Is This Caterpillar Trying to Look Like a Velvet Worm?

A team of researchers from Western University in Ontario reports the discovery of velvet worms living in tree mosses in Amazonian cloud forest in Ecuador as well as a caterpillar of unknown species that they propose to be a Batesian mimic of the velvet worm.