Education, Mosquito Management Programs, and Cooperation Needed to Stop Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya

2006
Prof. Frank Hadley Collins, Dir., Cntr. for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, Univ. of Notre Dame

This 2006 photograph depicted a female Aedes aegypti mosquito while she was in the process of acquiring a blood meal from her human host, who in this instance, was actually the biomedical photographer, James Gathany, here at the Centers for Disease Control.  The feeding apparatus consisting of a sharp, orange-colored “fascicle”, which while not feeding, is covered in a soft, pliant sheath called the "labellum”, which retracts as the sharp stylets contained within pierce the host's skin surface, as the insect obtains its blood meal. The orange color of the fascicle is due to the red color of the blood as it migrates up the thin, sharp translucent tube. Note the distended abdominal exoskeleton, which being translucent, allowed the color of the ingested blood meal to be visible.

DF and DHF are primarily diseases of tropical and sub-tropical areas, and the four different dengue serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4), are maintained in a cycle that involves humans and the Aedes mosquito. However, Aedes aegypti, a domestic, day-biting mosquito that prefers to feed on humans, is the most common Aedes species. Infections produce a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from a nonspecific viral syndrome to severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Important risk factors for DHF include the strain of the infecting virus, as well as the age, and especially the prior dengue infection history of the patient.

The Entomological Society of America (ESA) and Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil (SEB) held a Summit in Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil on 13 March, 2016 to discuss the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is the primary transmitter of Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. While the Summit featured talks on many aspects of mosquito biology, behavior, and control, […]

Entomologists Talk About Their Favorite Insects and Why Collections Are Important

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Our planet is teeming with multitudes of fascinating insects and there’s simply no time to study them all! Having a favorite one (for whatever reason) often helps narrow the choice down. In the following video, which was shot at the 2015 meetings of the Entomological Collections Network (ECN) and the Entomological Society of America, Derek […]

Entomologists Talk About Twitter at Entomology 2015

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By Derek Woller Twitter — some love it and some are indifferent, but I think we can all agree that it’s rapidly changing how people communicate with one another on a global scale, particularly when it comes to science. In this video, I challenge three of the most prolific entomological tweeters in North America — […]

Entomological Society of America Issues Statement on Tick-borne Diseases

2008
Dr. Christopher Paddock

This photograph depicts a dorsal view of a female Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni. This tick specie is a know North American vector of Rickettsia rickettsii, which is the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.Dermacentor andersoni is found in the Rocky Mountain states and in southwestern Canada. The life cycle of this tick may require up to 2 to 3 years for completion. Adult wood ticks feed primarily on large mammals, while the larvae and nymphs feed on small rodents. See PHIL 10869, for a side-by-side comparative view of both a male and female D. andersoni tick.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, like all rickettsial infections, is classified as a zoonosis. Zoonoses are diseases of animals that can be transmitted to humans. Many zoonotic diseases require a biological vector (e.g., a mosquito, tick, flea, or mite) in order to be transmitted from the animal host to the human host. In the case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ticks are the natural hosts, serving as both reservoirs and vectors of R. rickettsii. Ticks transmit the organism to vertebrates primarily by their bite. Less commonly, infections may occur following exposure to crushed tick tissues, fluids, or tick feces.

The Entomological Society of America (ESA) recently released a statement (http://www.entsoc.org/ticks) supporting the creation and implementation of a national strategy using Integrated Tick Management to better control tick populations and reduce the rapidly escalating impact of tick-borne diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, and Lyme disease. “The rapid rise in tick-borne diseases is […]

OUP Supporting World Malaria Day by Highlighting Top Articles

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World Malaria Day is Saturday, April 25, 2015 The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 584,000 people died in 2013 from malaria, a preventable and curable disease transmitted to people through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk, but the most common victims are women and children […]

Photos and Videos from Entomology 2014 in Portland, OR

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Entomology 2014, the 62nd Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America (ESA), ended last night. So far 17 videos have been posted to the ESA YouTube Channel, and more are on the way. Click here for Entomology 2014 videos. The University of Florida and North Carolina State University appeared in the Linnaean Games Finals, […]

The ACE International Program Launched Today During PestWorld in Orlando

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By Richard Levine I’m in Orlando, Florida for PestWorld, the annual meeting of the National Pest Management Association, along with Chris Stelzig, director of the Entomological Society of America’s Certification Program. We’ve been joined by a lot of Board Certified Entomologists, such as Richard Berman, Rebecca Baldwin, Chelle Hartzer, Forrest St. Aubin, Shripat Kamble, Tim […]

Entomologists Support Specimen Collections as Vital Component of Research

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In April, 2014 an article called “Avoiding (Re)extinction” was published in Science magazine that said that collecting biological could “magnify the extinction risk” for some species, and that alternatives such as “high-resolution photography, audio recording, and non-lethal sampling” could be used instead. The article drew quite a response, as more than 60 international research institutions […]

Florida Entomological Society to Co-locate Meeting with 2016 International Congress of Entomology

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The Florida Entomological Society (FES) has announced that it will co-locate its 2016 annual meeting with the XXV International Congress of Entomology (ICE), which will be held in Orlando, FL from September 25-30, 2016. Like the Olympics, the International Congress of Entomology is held every four years, and it attracts thousands of participants from all […]

Videos from Entomological Society of America Meetings

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ESA staff are either in Austin or are on their way, as are many meeting attendees who plan to get there early to attend the annual meeting of the Entomological Collections Network and the Austin Insect Rodeo Expo, both of which take place on Saturday. So today’s post will feature videos from past meetings, and […]