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Tag: entomology careers

entomologists in face masks and blue protective body suits posing for a group selfie

How One Entomologist Takes a ‘One Health’ Approach to Engage Across Disciplines

Meet Karen Poh, Ph.D., research entomologist at the USDA-ARS Animal Disease Research Unit, in Pullman, Washington, whose work in public health, animal and medical entomology earned her a spot in the Early Career Professional Recognition Symposium at the 2022 Joint Annual Meeting of ESA, ESC, and ESBC. Learn more about Poh and her work in this next installment of our "Standout Early Career Professionals" series.

five entomologists

Diversity in Career Paths: A Q&A With Five Entomologists

What jobs can we do as entomologists? More than you might think. For students looking ahead at potential career paths, learn from this Q&A with five entomologists working in a wide range of positions, from biotechnology to tourism and more.

Laura Figueroa, Ph.D., holding two insects, one in each hand

How One Entomologist Explores Flowers’ Dual Role for Bee Health

Meet Laura Figueroa, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, whose work in bee ecology and conservation earned her a spot in the Early Career Professional Recognition Symposium at the 2022 Joint Annual Meeting of ESA, ESC, and ESBC. Learn more about Figueroa and her work in the next installment of our "Standout Early Career Professionals" series.

science lab

Career Advancement Slower for Women in Entomology, Study Finds

Women pursuing careers in entomology face persistent challenges in obtaining jobs compared to men, according to a new study analyzing career tracks of recent entomology doctoral graduates. Among entomologists obtaining Ph.D.s between 2001 and 2018, significantly more men than women held industry positions as technical representatives and research scientists as of 2021. Across job categories, women outpaced men only in nonfaculty university positions. Meanwhile, men published significantly more research articles than women during their graduate programs and then went on to attain higher measures of publishing volume and influence.