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Tag: environmental entomology

Augochlorella aurata bee

Study Shows How Prescribed Burns Benefit Bees

Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

bumble bees on Penstamon rydbergii

New Study Helps California’s Bumble Bees by Identifying Their Favorite Flowers

Research in the Sierra Nevada region of California illustrates the varying flower choices of bumble bees: The five most common bumble bee species studied each selected a different assortment of flowers, and each selected at least one flower species not selected by the others. The findings are already being put to use in forest restoration efforts to increase and improve quality of bumble bee habitat.

Japanese beetle traps

For Less Bee Bycatch, Leave Geraniol Out of Japanese Beetle Traps

New research shows traps with eugenol and phenethyl propionate—and leaving out geraniol—remain effective in catching Japanese beetles but significantly reduce bycatch of native bees. Plus, entirely green, brown, black, or red traps are least attractive to native bees.

Japanese barberry

Impact of Invasive Japanese Barberry Cascades Through Local Food Webs

Dense thickets of invasive Japanese barberry significantly reduce the diversity and numbers of insects and arthropods in forests, according to new research. The ripple effects can extend upward throughout local ecosystems, even affecting human health via an increased presence of Lyme disease.

fall armyworm - Spodoptera frugiperda

Mixing Lawn Grass Varieties Could Trim Fall Armyworm Infestations

A simple change in the choice of grass varieties for lawns of St. Augustinegrass could be a key tool for fending off fall armyworm infestations, according to new research. While no single St. Augustinegrass cultivar rises above the rest in resisting infestation, mixing varieties may confer some benefits, as fall armyworms clearly preferred single-cultivar plantings in a series of lab tests.

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