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Tag: environmental entomology

solar farm pollinator habitat

Pollinator Conservation on Solar Farms: The Entomology Perspective

Amid the steady growth of solar energy production in the United States, pollinator conservation at solar installations has become an appealing secondary pursuit, but the long-term success of such efforts remains to be seen. In a new article published today in the journal Environmental Entomology, a group of entomologists say pairing solar energy with pollinator habitat offers great promise, but scientific evaluation and meaningful standards will be key to making it a true win-win combination.

emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

Online Entomology Outreach: Tips From a Long-Running Program

Emerald Ash Borer University has delivered critical knowledge about EAB and other invasive forest pests via webinar for more than a decade, and lessons learned from that experience can help improve other entomological extension and outreach efforts, as more of them adopt online formats in a post-pandemic world.

Loggerhead sea turtle, Cumberland Island, Georgia

Ants in the Nest: A Possible Emerging Pressure on Sea Turtles

Red imported fire ants and native ants may depress the emergence of sea turtle hatchlings, especially in nests near dune vegetation. A new study examines the interactions of ants with sea turtle nests and offers recommendations for reducing ant-related risks in sea turtle conservation.

Polybia paulista wasp nest

Can Cuticle Compounds Be Extracted From Insects Preserved in Ethanol?

Researchers studying hydrocarbons in insect cuticles typically avoid specimens preserved in ethanol, for fear the solvent may interfere with chemical analysis. A new study, however, finds ethanol has little effect—at least in the case of one wasp species tested—and opens the possibility that ethanol-preserved insects can indeed be used for the analysis of cuticular chemical compounds.

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