Dispatch From Puerto Rico: Entomological Research Faces Rebuilding—and Opportunity—After Hurricane Maria

El Verde Field Station September 2017

By Timothy D. Schowalter, Ph.D. In an article in the Fall 2017 issue of American Entomologist, “Long-term Entomological Research on Canopy Arthropods in a Tropical Rainforest in Puerto Rico,” I described arthropod responses to multiple hurricane and drought disturbances at the Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network site (a U.S. Forest Service and University […]

Alternatives: Entomologists Who Use Their Hard-Earned Research Skills in Non-Research Careers

Rayda Krell coffee table safari

By Laurel Haavik, Ph.D. Editor’s Note: This is the next installment in the “Behind the Science” series by Laurel Haavik that peeks into the lives of scientists. See other posts in the series. Graduate school, the traditional conduit to an academic career, trains people to conduct research. Yet, many people with graduate degrees don’t end […]

From Research to Extension: 5 Things I Learned When I Changed My Science Career Path

David R. Coyle, Ph.D.

By David R. Coyle, Ph.D. A couple of years ago, I changed careers. No, I didn’t leave science altogether; rather, I switched from a research career (the “tenure-track” path, if you will) to a 100 percent extension job. Why the switch? Several reasons. For me personally, a biggie was family (as in, we started one). […]

Forest Pest Invasions Can—And Should—Be Studied Before They Happen

Xyleborus glabratus and Euwallacea fornicatus

By Jiri Hulcr, Ph.D. Ambrosia beetles include some of the scariest invasive bugs. These tiny relatives of bark beetles travel the globe in wooden packaging used on commercial ships. They take their food with them: Instead of eating the wooden crates, ambrosia beetles grow symbiotic fungi inside the timber just like little farmers. As a […]

Ken Raffa Shares His Passion for Working with People to Understand Insects as Agents of Change

Editor’s note: This is the third installment in the “Behind the Science” series by Laurel Haavik that peeks into the lives of scientists. See other posts in the series. By Laurel Haavik, Ph.D. Ken Raffa has had a storied career. His research has made great strides in advancing current understanding of how insect populations can […]