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Tag: honey bees

100 RFID tags next to a penny

RFID Tracking: Where It Fits in an Entomologist’s Toolbox

If you've ever used an electronic pass in your car to pay a highway toll, then you know the basics of radio frequency identification (RFID) tracking. RFID tags are now available in sizes allowing for applications in entomological research. Here's how one scientist is using RFID in his research on honey bees.

yellowjacket - Vespula squamosa

Yellowjackets: A Look at Opportunistic Raiders of Honey Bee Hives

Yellowjackets are nuisance predators of honey bees, preying on them and pillaging their honey. But bees fight back, and healthy hives are rarely at risk. Learn more about yellowjackets, their interactions with bees, and what sets yellowjackets apart from hornets and other fellow wasps.

pollen sorted by color

Pollen Sleuths: Tracking Pesticides in Honey Bee Pollen to Their Source Plant

When pesticides show up in the pollen that honey bees collect, can the source plant be pinpointed? A new study is the first to successfully combine chemical analysis of pollen and the keen eye of a palynologist—an expert in identifying pollen microscopically—to track pesticide in bee-collected pollen to a source plant genus.

bees at hive

Colony Size Drives Honey Bees’ Overwinter Survival

Research in Pennsylvania shows that overall colony weight and the number of worker bees to be the leading factors in determining overwintering survival of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies. For colonies in which the combined weight of adult bees, brood, and food stores exceeded 30 kilograms, overwinter survival rates were about 94 percent.

honey bee basitarsi on blueberry stigma

No Buzz, No Problem: Study Shows How Honey Bees Pollinate Blueberries

Honey bees are incapable of buzz pollination, but they can (and do) perform pollination duties in highbush blueberry. A new study shows that, while honey bees rarely collect blueberry pollen in the pollen baskets on their hind legs, they frequently contact it with other body parts and transfer it to other flowers.

honey bees on brood frame

For Good of the Colony, Sick Honey Bee Brood Sounds the Alarm

Honey bees detect and remove brood afflicted with parasites or pathogens. A new study shows that part of this "hygienic behavior" relies on chemical signals emitted by unhealthy brood, and brood coming from colonies bred to be more hygienic are more effective in signaling for their own removal.

bee hive smoking

Why Smoking Soothes the Stressed-Out Bee Hive

A new study that explores the effect of smoke on honey bee (Apis mellifera) behavior finds that it reduces the instance of bees releasing a venom droplet in their signaling of danger to other bees, which researchers speculate may thereby reduce the amount of alarm pheromone released.

honey dyed red

Funny Honey at the Zoo Reveals Bees’ Foraging on Sugar Baits

In the course of a study on mosquito movement, researchers discovered that local colonies of honey bees had foraged on a nontoxic sugar bait meant for the mosquitoes. The bait was dyed red to track mosquitoes that fed on it, but the dye also showed up in much of the bees' honey.

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