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Tag: Invasive species

Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis)

Interagency Cooperation Drives Discovery of Lyme Disease Spirochete in Exotic Tick

Analysis of Asian longhorned ticks collected in Pennsylvania found just one—out of more than 250 tested—carrying the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. The invasive tick is unlikely to play a role in Lyme transmission, but the research underscores the importance of active tick and pathogen surveillance and collaboration among agencies at local, state, and national levels.

emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

Online Entomology Outreach: Tips From a Long-Running Program

Emerald Ash Borer University has delivered critical knowledge about EAB and other invasive forest pests via webinar for more than a decade, and lessons learned from that experience can help improve other entomological extension and outreach efforts, as more of them adopt online formats in a post-pandemic world.

and other associates that utilize native species. (Photo by Architect of the Capitol, via Flickr)

Planting a Tree? Choose a Native Species and Save Some Insects

Every invasive tree in the United States was intentionally introduced, and these plants often out-compete native plants while negatively affecting insects and other animals that depend on native species. You can do your part to help insects and protect local ecosystems by choosing native plants in your landscaping plans.

Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)

Exciting But Dreadful: New Invasive Forest Pest Arrives in South Carolina

The Asian longhorned beetle, a federally regulated invasive woodboring pest, was recently discovered in South Carolina—hundreds of miles from the nearest known infestation. Federal and state officials are working hard to try to eradicate this pest, and there are many research questions and opportunities associated with this infestation.

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