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Tag: Invasive species

cattle

New, Fast DNA Method Spots Pesticide-Resistant Ticks

In its effort to keep cattle fever ticks from escaping quarantine in five counties along the southern Texas border, researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture have developed an overnight DNA test that can detect ticks' genetic indicators of resistance to permethrin, a common pesticide used to manage ticks.

Brown marmorated stink bug adult and nymph

How to Tackle an Invasive Species Crisis? Build a Collaborative Team

The arrival of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) drove a far-reaching, collaborative response by researchers, integrated pest management professionals, government agencies, and growers. A new article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management looks back at this experience to share lessons learned for future invasive-species response efforts.

Apple maggot Pheno Forecast map, July 1, 2019

USA National Phenology Network Aids Management of Pest Insects With Life-Stage Forecast Maps

It's easier to manage an insect pest if you can predict where and when it's likely to show up, rather than trying to react after it appears. The USA National Phenology Network's "Pheno Forecast" maps offer daily updates that model the temperature conditions necessary for a dozen forest insect pests. A new article in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America showcases the tool, part of a new special collection on geospatial analysis of invasive insects.

potential distribution of spotted lanternfly in United States

Spotted Lanternfly: Large Potential Range in U.S. and Beyond

A new study published today in the Journal of Economic Entomology models potential suitable habitat for the invasive spotted lanternfly and shows large swaths of the United States and beyond are likely to be vulnerable should the spotted lanternfly continue to spread.

Japanese barberry

Impact of Invasive Japanese Barberry Cascades Through Local Food Webs

Dense thickets of invasive Japanese barberry significantly reduce the diversity and numbers of insects and arthropods in forests, according to new research. The ripple effects can extend upward throughout local ecosystems, even affecting human health via an increased presence of Lyme disease.

Spathius galinae

A Promising New Parasitoid Drills Down on Emerald Ash Borers

In a recent study, the wasp Spathius galinae successfully established wild populations and outperformed other parasitoids in attacking invasive emerald ash borers in three northeastern states in the U.S. Researchers say it could become a useful biological control agent to protect native ash trees.

African fig fly - Zaprionus indianus

Drosophilid Melting Pot: African Fig Fly Meets Spotted-Wing Drosophila in the U.S.

The African fig fly (Zaprionus indianus) is an invasive fruit fly in North America that has been found commingling with its cousin spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), sometimes even using the latter's egg-laying sites for its own. A new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management highlights the African fig fly's biology and range and offers options for management.

urban wetlands

Mosquito Management is Key in Creating Popular Urban Wetlands

A study that shows mosquitoes might benefit from wetland-management tactics aimed at protecting frogs illustrates the complicated ecological dynamics present in urban wetlands. Understanding the habitat requirements and ecological interactions of local mosquito species is critical to balancing such wetlands' risks and benefits.

Grand Challenges Vancouver summit panel

The Path Forward on Invasive Arthropods: Collaboration, Innovation, and More

Invasive insects and related arthropod species are a global challenge that transcend national borders. Stakeholders from the United States, Canada, and around the world convened in Vancouver in November 2018 to chart a path forward. Here are the key calls to action they identified to address the challenge of invasive arthropod alien species.

khapra beetle - Trogoderma granarium

Khapra Beetle Can’t Beat the Heat

The khapra beetle does outsize damage to stored grains and is a top target at ports and border crossings. Researchers in Canada have found the threshold temperature that will kill the beetle at all life stages, even diapause.

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