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Tag: Journal of Economic Entomology

pink bollworm - Pectinophora gossypiella

Pink Bollworm Versus Bt Cotton: Three Countries, Three Results

A new article in the Journal of Economic Entomology examines varying levels of resistance to Bt toxins developed by the pink bollworm in the United States, China, and India over the last 20 years, illustrating the importance of incorporating refuge crops in Bt systems. 

Spathius galinae

A Promising New Parasitoid Drills Down on Emerald Ash Borers

In a recent study, the wasp Spathius galinae successfully established wild populations and outperformed other parasitoids in attacking invasive emerald ash borers in three northeastern states in the U.S. Researchers say it could become a useful biological control agent to protect native ash trees.

German cockroach - Blattella germanica

Building-Wide Pest Management Program Stops Cockroaches From Moving Nextdoor

A study of the spatial distribution of German cockroaches in a high-rise apartment building found infestations were clustered in groups of adjacent units. But a building-wide integrated pest management program can be successful in eliminating most infestations and, importantly, stopping the cockroaches from migrating from one apartment to the next.

mandarin oranges

Mandarin Boom Means Citrus Pest Management Must Evolve

The rise in popularity of mandarin oranges has outpaced knowledge of how integrated pest management (IPM) for them might differ from that of larger oranges. New research combines field study with years of data from citrus groves and shows that mandarins stand up surprisingly well to insect pests.

comparative traps

Mesh to Reduce Bycatch: A Simple Solution to a Sticky Problem

Sticky traps used to monitor orchards for the Asian citrus psyllid often catch an array of larger non-target organisms. But a thin layer of mesh fabric—the same kind used in bridal veils and ballet tutus—makes an effective screen to eliminate most bycatch while still catching the target pests.

Trichopria anastrephae

New Study Aims to Protect Parasitoids of Spotted-Wing Drosophila

Use of an insecticide can be counterproductive if it also harms natural enemies of a target pest. A new study puts several insecticides currently in use to manage spotted-wing drosophila to the test to see how they do or don't affect parasitoids of the invasive fruit fly.

brown marmorated stink bug - Halyomorpha halys

Stink Bugs Stay Out: Study Measures Gaps Needed for Invasion

If a structure has a gap or entrance large enough for brown marmorated stink bugs to fit through, they will find it. But a new study shows that slits less than 3 millimeters wide and holes less than 7 millimeters wide should successfully exclude the vast majority of the bugs. A related study examines how overwintering stink bugs react to corpses of their fellow bugs remaining from previous winters.

khapra beetle - Trogoderma granarium

Khapra Beetle Can’t Beat the Heat

The khapra beetle does outsize damage to stored grains and is a top target at ports and border crossings. Researchers in Canada have found the threshold temperature that will kill the beetle at all life stages, even diapause.

bees at hive

Colony Size Drives Honey Bees’ Overwinter Survival

Research in Pennsylvania shows that overall colony weight and the number of worker bees to be the leading factors in determining overwintering survival of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies. For colonies in which the combined weight of adult bees, brood, and food stores exceeded 30 kilograms, overwinter survival rates were about 94 percent.

Coptotermes formosanus termites

So, You Want to Study Termite Control? Step 1: Raise a Few Million Termites

Subterranean termite colonies can be as large as 1 million individuals with a foraging territory and underground galleries stretching up to 100 meters long. How does an entomologist study something that large? Here's a behind-the-scenes look at how researchers at the University of Florida have raised entire termite colonies from scratch and devised experimental setups that mimic large foraging and nesting areas while still fitting inside a lab.

honey bees on brood frame

For Good of the Colony, Sick Honey Bee Brood Sounds the Alarm

Honey bees detect and remove brood afflicted with parasites or pathogens. A new study shows that part of this "hygienic behavior" relies on chemical signals emitted by unhealthy brood, and brood coming from colonies bred to be more hygienic are more effective in signaling for their own removal.

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