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Tag: Journal of Integrated Pest Management

Varroa destructor mite

Varroa Mites: New Guide Outlines Integrated Pest Management Options

A growing consensus deems Varroa mite infestation to be the leading factor in the struggles of honey bees in managed hives around the world. A new profile in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management details the biology and life cycle of the Varroa destructor mite and the IPM approach to control the devastating ectoparasites.

citrus greening - trees

A People Problem and Plant Disease: The Economics of Pest Management in Citrus Greening

Citrus greening disease is seriously hindering citrus production in the United States, but generating widespread adoption of the best integrated pest management practices among growers is a challenge, especially when livelihoods are on the line. Recognizing the strong economic factors at play in management decisions will help improve plans for increasing IPM adoption.

wheat bug - Nysius huttoni - adult

More Than Wheat to Eat: New Zealand’s Wheat Bug Has a Taste for Brassicas, Too

The wheat bug Nysius huttoni is a significant pest of wheat and cereal crops as well as a variety of brassica plants, and it is widely distributed in New Zealand. In a new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management, two New Zealand researchers offer guidance on IPM practices for managing the wheat bug while minimizing potential nontarget impacts.

pecan nut casebearer - Acrobasis nuxvorella

Pecan Nut Casebearer: New Guide Provides IPM Options

Pecan is one of the few plants native to North America that is now an important horticultural crop. One of its most significant pests, however, is the pecan nut casebearer. A new guide in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management profiles the pecan nut casebearer and outlines management methods for it.

millet field

Millet Production Is On the Rise, and So Are the Pests That Eat It

Millet is a staple crop in Africa and Asia and increasingly common elsewhere, as demand for whole-grain products continues to rise. At least 150 insect species are known to feed on millet, and a new profile in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management highlights the biology and management options for several of the most significant ones.

Japanese beetle on hemp

IPM in Hemp: Managing Pests in a “New” Crop

With hemp recently legalized for commercial production in the United States, growers are in need of integrated pest management (IPM) guidance. A new profile in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management offers a current synopsis of existing research on insect and arthropod pests of hemp and notes where future research is needed.

European earwigs

European Earwig: Fruit Pest, Potential Ally, or Both?

A new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management busts some myths about the European earwig (Forficula auricularia). Though perceived as a pest, it is actually an underappreciated biological control agent and likely a beneficial insect in most apple orchards.

African fig fly - Zaprionus indianus

Drosophilid Melting Pot: African Fig Fly Meets Spotted-Wing Drosophila in the U.S.

The African fig fly (Zaprionus indianus) is an invasive fruit fly in North America that has been found commingling with its cousin spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), sometimes even using the latter's egg-laying sites for its own. A new profile in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management highlights the African fig fly's biology and range and offers options for management.

longan tree

New Guide Details Pest-Management Practices for Longan

A major fruit export from Vietnam, longan has been well studied in Southeast Asia, but a new profile in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management offers a compilation of longan IPM research for potentially new audiences.

Ecuador farm field

Why IPM Adoption is Lower in Developing Countries

Integrated pest management comes with a variety of benefits, but its mix of methods can present complicated choices to growers low on resources and agricultural advice. A new report in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management outlines some potential solutions.

Japanese beetle infestation on corn silk

New Guide Offers IPM Tips for Japanese Beetles in Soy and Corn

An invasive species established in the eastern United States for more than a century, the Japanese beetle is making its way into Midwestern soybean and corn fields. A new review in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management offers a guide to the pest's biology and behavior and methods to fend it off.

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