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Tag: Journal of Medical Entomology

Female anopheles gambiae mosquito feeding detailed high definiti

Cannibalism in Mosquito Larvae Confounds Egg Counts

New research shows that late-stage Anopheles gambiae larvae will eat eggs and first-instar larvae of their own species, calling into question the common view that females of the mosquito species avoid laying eggs in water where other larvae are already present.

Haemaphysalis longicornis

Invasive Tick Persists in New Jersey

Officials in New Jersey report that the invasive tick Haemaphysalis longicornis has successfully overwintered and was found once again on a rural property in mid-April 2018, after an infestation was reported there in 2017, the first such appearance of the species within North American borders.

lone star tick - Amblyomma americanum

Landscape Terrain Provides New Angle for Measuring Tick Abundance

A study of lone star ticks in the forested Missouri Ozarks found that nymphs and adults were more abundant in valleys and on north-facing hills than in other areas. Meanwhile, nymphs appeared less often in the areas of greater temperature variability, while adults were less prevalent with increased elevation.

Sclerodermus macrogaster

Curious Wasp Specimen Leads Entomologist to Find a First

When Michael Skvarla, Ph.D., joined Penn State University's entomology extension program in 2017, it wasn't long before he had a mystery on his hands: A wasp specimen from an infestation of a residence that appeared to be of a genus not previously known to invade homes in North America.

bed bug closeup

Study ID’s Several Bed Bug Repellents That Could Keep Your Luggage Pest-Free

Travelers' luggage is an attractive harbor for bed bugs, which then hitch a ride to new locations. In the search for effective bed bug repellents, researchers at Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and Bedoukian Research, Inc., have found that DEET as well as several naturally derived compounds could protect luggage from attracting stowaway bed bugs.

blacklegged tick

Why the Variety of Tick Hosts in Your Back Yard Might Be a Good Thing

A new study in Connecticut finds that residential habitats harbor a greater diversity of animal hosts for blacklegged ticks, many of which don't transmit the Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi to ticks as well as white-footed mice do, thereby leading to lower levels of the pathogen's presence in residential areas compared to woodland habitats.